Whether you’re building a new home or making plumbing-related enhancements to an existing home, it’s vital to ensure your installation adheres to current city and state codes. There are several key reasons why the government plays a role in the plumbing of private homes. First, private plumbing is inherently integrated into shared water and sewer systems. Plumbing code is necessary for the benefit of public health and to sustain the function and safety of these shared systems. States and cities publish their own codes to ensure the health and safety of their residents. A failure to comply with plumbing code can potentially put a community at risk for disease.

 

Plumbing code has also been created to keep homes safe and energy efficient. A lack of compliance can not only jeopardize a home’s eventual sale if an inspector identifies the issue, it can potentially create a hazard that can increase consumption of utilities and even put a home’s occupants in danger.
With plumbing projects, it’s likely you will need to obtain an inspection to ensure the work meets current code. Because local plumbing code varies by city and state, it’s important to work with a licensed plumber who understands exactly what is necessary for compliance. Licensed plumbers also know when a project requires an inspector’s approval and has the plan and skills to ensure it does. It’s important to note that violations of plumbing code can lead to both criminal and civil action. This includes unsafe installations and non-inspected work. In other words, be very wary of any plumber who doesn’t take code compliance very seriously. Don’t be shy about asking a plumber if they’re going to pull a permit and get an inspection.
To look at the special codes (if any) in your city, click your cities’ link:

Common Code

While there are many variations to plumbing code, there are some common code considerations that all cities and states share. A top priority is venting because drainpipes that aren’t vented properly can release noxious fumes into a home. Other common code considerations include:
  • Location of fixtures
  • Pipe materials
  • Size of pipes, drains, vents and supply lines
  • Shut-off valves
  • Slope for drainpipes
  • Access panels
The key is working with a licensed plumber who understands the code specifics that are relevant to the installation. What are these specifics? Among Tarrant County cities, some strictly follow the International Plumbing Code, a comprehensive model plumbing code developed by the International Code Council (ICC).
This code sets minimum regulations for plumbing systems and components to protect life, health and safety of building occupants and the public. Other cities have amended plumbing code that extend beyond these minimum regulations. It’s important to note that updates to city and state plumbing codes happen on a regular basis. Licensed plumbing contracts have a duty to stay on top of all code modifications to ensure their customers’ homes meet the most current regulations.
These two cities have amended the 2015 International Plumbing Code with several modifications to regulations for relief valves for pressure. The purpose of these modifications is to provide additional protection to the public water supply. For homeowners, this means that there is now an additional cost for installing a pressure relief device to their plumbing system. As well, reverse osmosis systems must now have an air gap made for them.

The City of Fort Worth currently uses the 2009 International Plumbing Code with several local amendments. These include provisions regarding sizing of water piping systems, structural safety and water recovery.

The City of Arlington uses the 2009 International Plumbing Code with several local amendments. These include provisions regarding sewer depth, drainage and vent water testing, gravity sewer testing and condensate disposal.

The City of Bedford uses the 2015 International Plumbing Code.

The City of Burleson uses the 2012 International Plumbing Code with several local amendments. These include provisions regarding inspections, testing, condensate disposal, drain pipe materials and sizes, minimum number of fixtures, water connection, shower floors, location of water heaters, discharge piping, maximum flow rate, beverage dispensers and connections to lawn irrigations systems.

The City of Colleyville uses the 2012 International Plumbing Code with several local amendments. These include provisions regarding sewer depth, protection of components of plumbing systems, condensate disposal, drain pipe materials and sizes, minimum number of fixtures, location of water heaters, state maximum flow rate, thermal expansion control, location of shutoff valves, connections to lawn irrigation systems, dual pump systems and drainage design.

The City of Euless uses the 2009 International Plumbing Code.

The City of Grand Prairie uses the 2015 International Plumbing Code, excluding the appendices and Sections 108.2, 108.3 and 108.4.

The City of Grapevine uses the 2006 International Plumbing Code with several local amendments. These include provisions regarding sewer depth, washroom and toilet room requirements, inspections, testing, condensate disposal, drain pipe materials and sizes, plumbing facilities and fixtures, shower floors, location of water heaters, discharge pipes, water service pipes, lawn irrigations systems and design of drainage systems.

The City of Hurst uses the 2009 International Plumbing Code.

The City of Keller uses the 2015 International Plumbing Code with several local amendments. These include provisions regarding sewer depth, condensate disposal, water connections, location of floor drains, discharge piping, location of shutoff valves, and the location of water heaters.

The City of Mansfield uses the 2006 International Plumbing Code with several local amendments. These include provisions regarding inspections, testing, condensate disposal, drain pipe materials and sizes, minimum number of fixtures, water connection, shower floors, location of water heaters, discharge piping, maximum flow rate, beverage dispensers and connections to lawn irrigations systems.

The City of Richland Hills uses the 2012 International Plumbing Code with North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) amendments.

The City of Southlake uses the 2015 International Plumbing Code with several local amendments. These include provisions regarding sewer depth, protection of components of a plumbing system, condensate disposal, water connections and location of floor drains.

Have Questions?

With such a broad range of city and state plumbing regulations, the best strategy for your plumbing project is to choose a licensed, experienced plumbing company. Call Horizon Plumbing today to learn more about current city codes, inspections and ensuring your project is completed successfully the first time.
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